understanding

Facilitator Course through TRAINYOUCAN

PURPOSE OF TRAIN THE TRAINER OR FACILITATOR COURSE
Train the trainer will provide recognition for those who facilitate, trainer or intend to facilitate learning using a variety of given methodologies. Formal recognition will enhance their employability and also provide a means to identify competent learning facilitators.

Train the Trainer Course

TRAINYOUCAN Accredited SETA Training Network offer the Train the Trainer course also known as the Facilitator Course in KwaZulu-Natal Durban, Gauteng Midrand and the Western Cape Brakenfell.

Train the Trainer Course

People credited with this unit standard are able to:
1.Plan and prepare for facilitation and training
2.Facilitate and train learning; and
3.Evaluate learning and facilitation.

Train the Trainer Course

LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING
The credit calculation is based on the assumption that learners are already competent in the learning area in which they will provide training.

Train the Trainer Course

TRAIN THE TRAINER COURSE WILL ENABLE YOU TO
1. Practitioners are required to demonstrate that they can perform the specific outcomes with understanding and reflexivity. However, at this level they will have internalised the “rules” or principles, which inform what they do, and will not longer be operating consciously with such rules.
2. The specific outcomes should be performed in line with an established approach for facilitating and training learning using a variety of methodologies. At this level practitioners should be able to describe two alternative facilitation and training methodologies, to explain how their performance would differ when using the different methodologies, and to justify their choice of methodology.
3. At this level, practitioners should be able to relate knowledge beyond their occupational and ETD competences to the performance of the ETD competence described in this standard.

Train the Trainer Course

TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network 12210

TRAINYOUCAN Accredited Training Network is a Private Higher Education Institution registered with the DHET (Department of Higher Education and Training) and accredited through the ETDP SETA with level 4 BEE status. TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network TRAINYOUCAN Accredited Training Network is a Private Higher Education Institution registered with the DHET (Department of Higher Education and Training) and accredited through the ETDP SETA with level 4 BEE status. TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network As part of our barest minimum standard and as can be attested by our previous and existing clients, are we fully compliant with all the requirements of the NQF act. We very clear in what we offer and do not get involved in any fraudulent or misleading advertising. TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network Our Members Forum consist of over 17800 discussions, templates, model answers and incentive course discounts for every single course offered by our network. That’s right! We have free resources and discussions on every single course offered to members who attended a course with us with life-time access and support. TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network In order to ensure that the overall quality of learning and assessment in South Africa is maintained at a consistently high level, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) requires that all corporate learning departments be accredited by the relevant ETQA. TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network As part of our barest minimum standard and as can be attested by our previous and existing clients, are we fully compliant with all the requirements of the NQF act. We very clear in what we offer and do not get involved in any fraudulent or misleading advertising. TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network

Understanding Point of View

Point of view is the way the author allows you to “see” and “hear” what’s going on. Skillful authors can fix their readers’ attention on exactly the detail, opinion, or emotion the author wants to emphasize by manipulating the point of view of the story.

Point of view comes in three varieties, which the English scholars have handily numbered for your convenience:

  • First-person point of view is in use when a character narrates the story with I-me-my-mine in his or her speech. The advantage of this point of view is that you get to hear the thoughts of the narrator and see the world depicted in the story through his or her eyes. However, remember that no narrator, like no human being, has complete self-knowledge or, for that matter, complete knowledge of anything. Therefore, the reader’s role is to go beyond what the narrator says.

For example, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird is told from the point of view of Scout, a young child. She doesn’t grasp the complex racial and socioeconomic relations of her town — but the reader does, because Scout gives information that the reader can interpret. Also, Scout’s innocence reminds the reader of a simple, “it’s-not-fair” attitude that contrasts with the rationalizations of other characters.

  • Second-person point of view, in which the author uses you and your, is rare; authors seldom speak directly to the reader. When you encounter this point of view, pay attention. Why? The author has made a daring choice, probably with a specific purpose in mind. Most times, second-person point of view draws the reader into the story, almost making the reader a participant in the action.


Here’s an example: Jay McInerney’s best-selling Bright Lights, Big City was written in second person to make the experiences and tribulations of the unnamed main character more personal and intimate for the reader.

  • Third-person point of view is that of an outsider looking at the action. The writer may choose third-person omniscient, in which the thoughts of every character are open to the reader, or third-person limited, in which the reader enters only one character’s mind, either throughout the entire work or in a specific section. Third-person limited differs from first-person because the author’s voice, not the character’s voice, is what you hear in the descriptive passages.

In Virginia Woolf’s wonderful novel Mrs. Dalloway, you’re in one character’s mind at a time. You know the title character’s thoughts about Peter, the great love of her youth, for example, and then a few pages later, you hear Peter’s thoughts about Mrs. Dalloway. Fascinating! When you’re reading a third-person selection, either limited or omniscient, you’re watching the story unfold as an outsider. Remember that most writers choose this point of view.